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James Stout Irvine Attorney 2017

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Hiring Family Law Litigation Attorney Irvine

Job description

  • $50 through $100 per hour for licensed attorney in Irvine California
  • Family Law and Civil Litigation part time Contract Attorney
  • Complete, file and serve pleading forms for family law attorney
  • Trial proceedings: organizing evidence; preparing exhibits; scheduling witnesses
  • Litigation: scheduling motion hearings, reviewing, proof-reading
  • Calendaring: communicating with counsel, clients and court

Contact James Stout jstout@jstoutlaw.com

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Hiring Paralegal or Legal Assistant Irvine

Job description

  • $20 through $50 per hour Paralegal or Legal Assistant Irvine California
  • Family Law and Civil Litigation part time contract paralegal or legal assistant
  • Complete, file and serve pleading forms for family law attorney
  • Trial proceedings: organizing evidence; preparing exhibits; scheduling witnesses
  • Litigation: scheduling motion hearings, reviewing, proof-reading
  • Calendaring: communicating with counsel, clients and court

Contact James Stout at jstout@jstoutlaw.com

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James Stout Irvine Attorney 2017

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Black Mirror on Netflix

 

Black Mirror, the Millennial’s Twilight Zone released its season four.  It is a surreal mind-blower.  The question is whether you will be up for more dystopian technological terror.

Black Mirror creator Charlie Brooker, who wrote or co-wrote all six episodes that debuted on Netflix on December 29, 2017 stated that “there is some more hope” in this season, but that’s only true to a limited extent. Although a couple of the new installments have a lighter tone, three of the others skew unflinchingly dark.

black-mirror-season-4-2

“USS Callister”, the opening episode, is the series’s most ambitious to date. It features Robert Daly, a computer coder who codes a virtual-reality game as a homage to his favorite fantasy series Star Trek and uses it to torture computer-generated clones of his co-workers who belittle him in real life.  Robert isn’t just the socially awkward nerd he appears to be. Every night, he goes home to live out a custom fantasy built inside his own private game server. There, he lords his power over the space ship crew, virtual simulations of his colleagues, which he creates by surreptitiously extracting their DNA from everyday office trash, like coffee-cup lids.

He is Captain Kirk in the game, and bosses them around as revenge for their real life snubs and harassment.  His real life assistant, Nanette, admires him for his stellar computer coding, but nothing else.  In one telling scene in the episode, Robert erases Nanette’s mouth, so she can’t breathe, plead, or even verbalize her pain. It’s his way of establishing that he has complete power in the simulated universe, and the sociopathic will to use it to torture his captives. The clones are digital copies of their real selves with full memories and feelings.  The virtual game is as real as a never ending nightmare.

Black Mirror is supposed to reflect a version of our own experience back at us, while sounding technology-enhanced alarms about what the future may hold. “Humanity is screwed” feels like a common refrain for the show.  Black Mirror is an anthology series that taps into our collective unease with the modern world, with each stand-alone episode a sharp, suspenseful tale exploring themes of contemporary techno-paranoia leading to an unforgettable and disturbing conclusion.

 

 

 

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The Flat Earthers are growing in America

Internet searches for “FLAT EARTH” have more than doubled over the past two years according to Google Trends.

Flat Earth Graph 2018

IT IS a stunt worthy of Evel Knievel. This week, if all goes to plan, “Mad” Mike Hughes, a Californian, will launch himself 1,800 feet (550 metres) into the sky in a homemade steam-powered rocket made of scrap metal. As well as providing entertainment, Mr Hughes wants to prove a point. On his trip over the Mojave Desert, which could propel him at speeds of up to 500 miles (800km) per hour, the 61-year-old limousine-driver-turned-daredevil hopes to prove that the Earth is flat states the The Economist

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James Stout Irvine Attorney 2017

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Can the police track your cell phone without a warrant?

2000px-Seal_of_the_United_States_Supreme_Court.svgThe U.S. Supreme Court confronts the digital age again on Wednesday when it hears oral arguments in a case that promises to have major repercussions for law enforcement and personal privacy.  Here is the Appellant Brief

At issue is whether police have to get a search warrant in order to obtain cellphone location information that is routinely collected and stored by wireless providers.

The court previously ruled that the Police cannot search your cell phone without a warrant.

Carpenter v. United States is a pending case before the United States Supreme Court and raises the question of whether the government violates the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution by accessing an individual’s historical cell phone locations records without a warrant. On June 5, 2017, the Court agreed to review this case when it granted Carpenter’s petition for writ of certiorariOral argument before the Supreme Court is scheduled for Wednesday, November 29, 2017.[1] By some, the case is considered the most important Fourth Amendment case that the Supreme Court has heard in a generation.[2][3]

In 2011, the FBI was investigating a series of armed robberies at Radio Shack and T-Mobile stores in and around Detroit. The FBI agents suspected Timothy Carpenter of working as a getaway driver for the robbers. They sought location data for Carpenter’s cell phone, which showed that Carpenter was near each of the robberies when they were happening. Carpenter argued in court that tracking his location using his cell phone was unconstitutional. The government pushed back with a bold legal claim. It argued that it can use cell phones to track the location of anyone it wants at any time, without violating the Constitution.

The Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals agreed with the government. It concluded that the Fourth Amendment’s warrant requirement did not apply to cell-phone tracking. Because Carpenter has no privacy or property rights in the location data that his phone transmits, and because the data does not reveal the contents of Carpenter’s phone calls, the government can obtain it without a warrant. Out of options, Carpenter filed a petition at the Supreme Court.

Up until now, the Supreme Court has stuck with the framework it adopted nearly 40 years ago that distinguishes between material in one’s home or car, and material that is out in the open, or shared with others. But as Justice Sonia Sotomayor suggested in a case five years ago, the entire framework used in the past may well be “ill-suited to the digital age.”

She said that because people now “reveal a great deal of information about themselves in order to carry out mundane tasks,” it may be time to reconsider past decisions that allow police to get information without a warrant from third parties like phone companies or banks or e-mail providers.

 

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Millennials face largest wealth gap in generations

Millennials wealth gap

A 2017 analysis by Credit Suisse suggests that millennials in several advanced economies are likely going to face the worst income inequality of any generation in recent memory.  Millennials are generally saddled with more student debt, less inherited money, and stricter mortgages than previous generations. At the same time, a lucky few are set to become spectacularly wealthy, widening the already large gap between rich and poor. Why?

This year’s report focuses in on Millennials and their wealth accumulation prospects. Overall the data point to a “Millennial disadvantage”, comprising among others tighter mortgage rules, growing house prices, increased income inequality and lower income mobility, which holds back wealth accumulation by young workers and savers in many countries. However, bright spots remain, with a recent upsurge in the number of Forbes billionaires below the age of 30 and a more positive picture in China and other emerging markets.

Millennials are doing less well than their parents at the same age, especially in relation to income, home ownership and other dimensions of well- being assessed in this report. While Millennials are more educated than preceding generations…we expect only a minority of high achievers and those in high- effectively overcome the ‘millennial disadvantage.’”

2017 Credit Suisse Global Wealth Report

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